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Program of Study

Your program of study consists of core DNP program requirements plus courses recommended by your advisor or supervisory committee based on your interests.


Developing Your Program of Study

  1. Beginning the first quarter of your doctoral program, you should maintain an ongoing program of study listing the courses you are taking and plan to take.
  2. Once your Supervisory Committee has been appointed, you will work with your committee chair to expand upon your program of study to include your future coursework.
  3. The program of study is then submitted to your supervisory committee for formal review and approval.
  4. Your supervisory committee uses the School of Nursing Guidelines for Program of Study Approval to review your program of study.
  5. After your supervisory committee approves your program of study, you must submit a signed hard copy and electronic copy to Academic Services for your student file.

When initially writing the program of study, you may not know the specifics of your capstone project, but you should have an idea of its general focus.


Guidelines for Approval of the Program of Study

The Supervisory Committee evaluates the proposed program of study using the following guidelines:

  1. Does the coursework support the student's goals and interests?
  2. What is the content and scope of plans for guided scholarship/independent study? Is adequate "guidance" available?
  3. Are the courses logically consistent for the described program of study?
  4. What is the degree of exposure of the student to various faculty expertise across the University and School?
  5. To what extent does the program provide a) depth of study as well as preparation beyond the single capstone project planned, and b) role development as a Doctor of Nursing Practice?
  6. Are all program requirements met? Does the program of study comply with all University rules and regulations?
  7. Is it feasible to implement and complete the program of study in a timely manner?
  8. If courses are proposed that were taken at another University or for another program of study (e.g. master's), do they represent adequate content? Is the content appropriately current?